Chinese Food

Perhaps more than any other bit of Chinese culture Chinese food is World Culture The Chinese restaurant is ubiquitous in the west and virtually every English city and Town has at least one Chinse eatery .  

Chinese food enjoys a high reputation in the world not only for its exquisite, delicious taste and charming appearance but also for its sheer abundance. It is due to the diversity of the climate, products and customs that there are widely different food styles and tastes in local regions. Throughout our long history, cuisine has played an important role and now is considered an integral part of the nation’s traditional culture. Colorful, aromatic and delicious are characteristics of China’s varied cuisines. Wherever you find yourself in China, your senses are tested to the extreme whilst enjoying the unusual dishes, often unique for the area you are visiting. Because China’s local dishes have their own typical characteristics, Chinese food can be divided into eight regional cuisines, the distinction of which is now widely accepted. They are: Beijing Cuisine, Shanghai Cuisine, Sichuan Cuisine, Shangdong Cuisine, Jiangsu Cuisine, Guangdong Cuisine, Fujian Cuisine and Anhui Cuisine.

 

 

 Chopsticks

Chinese choose chopsticks as their tableware rather than a knife and fork since Chinese people, under the cultural guidance of Confucianism, consider a knife and fork to represent a sort of violence, and to resemble cold weapons. However, chopsticks reflect gentleness and benevolence, the main moral teachings of Confucianism. Chinese food seems to taste better when eaten with chopsticks which are the special utensil that the Chinese use to dine with. It is usually an awkward first experience for foreigners to use chopsticks with their meal. Fortunately, learning to eat with chopsticks is not difficult. The secret to using chopsticks is to hold one chopstick in place while pivoting the other one to pick up individual portions. How to position the chopsticks is the secret you have to learn. First, place the first chopstick so that the thicker part rests at the base of your thumb and the thinner part rests on the lower side of your middle fingertip. Then, bring your thumb forward so that the stick will be firmly trapped in place. At least two or three inches of chopstick of the thinner end should extend beyond your fingertip. Next, position the other chopstick so that it is held against the side of your index finger by the end of your thumb. Check whether the ends of the chopsticks are even. If not, then tap the thinner parts on the plate to make them even. Ok, now you are going to practice. Just place a little pressure on the upper chopstick, the one against your index finger, to make it pivot on the index finger while keeping the bottom chopstick stationary. Isn’t it easy? After a little practice, you can use them to enjoy any meal including Chinese food. Certainly in the first few attempts, you have to take care. How to position the chopsticks is the secret you have to learn. First, place the first chopstick so that the thicker part rests at the base of your thumb and the thinner part rests on the lower side of your middle fingertip. Then, bring your thumb forward so that the stick will be firmly trapped in place. At least two or three inches of chopstick of the thinner end should extend beyond your fingertip. Next, position the other chopstick so that it is held against the side of your index finger by the end of your thumb. Check whether the ends of the chopsticks are even. If not, then tap the thinner parts on the plate to make them even. Ok, now you are going to practice. Just place a little pressure on the upper chopstick, the one against your index finger, to make it pivot on the index finger while keeping the bottom chopstick stationary. Isn’t it easy? After a little practice, you can use them to enjoy any meal including Chinese food. Certainly in the first few attempts, you have to take care.

 

 Food Symbolism

In China, foods are given particular meanings, so that in certain occasion a type of food, can only be eaten by some specific individuals, or must be eaten in specific occasion.

An honored guest will be served a snapper’s head or shell to hail him and show warmly welcome in some districts. Long noodle is the symbol of longevity in China, so that youngsters or seniors all will have a bowl of Long Life Noodle in the expectation of a healthy life. In Central China, if a baby is born, his father will send Red Boiled Eggs to announce the news. An even number, usually six or eight Red Boiled Eggs with a black point dotted on one end will be delivered for a boy and an odd number, usually five or seven without black point for a girl. Fish is always served to symbolize accumulations of prosperity and wealth with the New Year’s Eve meals. There are other foods and snacks, which symbolize good wishes under special circumstances. These include duck, chicken and melon seeds.